Study Finds Important Gaps, New Research Priorities in Pediatric Concussion

“We were hoping to assemble neuroimaging data around concussion in kids to inform our research – instead we were surprised to find big gaps,” said Dr. Julia Schmidt, a post-doctoral fellow with Drs. Lara Boyd and Jill Zwicker. “Despite the prevalence and urgency of concussion, there were very few studies that looked at brain differences post-injury in children specifically.” A systematic review, published…
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The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATP-binding cassette transporter Rv1747 is a putative exporter of cell wall biosynthesis intermediates. Rv1747 has a cytoplasmic regulatory module consisting of two pThr-interacting Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains connected by a conformationally disordered linker with two phospho-acceptor threonines (pThr). The structures of FHA-1 and FHA-2 were determined by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. Relative to…
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Sporulation is used by some types of bacteria to survive harsh environmental conditions, such as extreme temperatures, chemical disinfection, or periods of nutrient deprivation1. Strains of the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus often cause food-borne illnesses due to cross-contamination; their ability to sporulate allows them to withstand standard sanitation protocols within the food industry2. The process of sporulation begins with unequal cell division of…
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Investments are a critical component in innovation. Without funding, it would be impossible to carry out the research that leads to the next breakthrough to grow our economy, and it’s government-funded basic research that gets the ball rolling. “What you don’t see is venture capitalists funding broad-based research,” says John Ruffolo, Chief Executive Officer at OMERS Ventures. “And this is just like…
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The development of cell-based therapies to replace missing or damaged tissues within the body or generate cells with a unique biological activity requires a reliable and accessible source of cells. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have emerged as a strong candidate cell source capable of extended propagation in vitro and differentiation to clinically relevant cell types. However, the application of…
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New Study Launches in St. Paul’s Hospital Emergency Department

An innovative new interventional clinical trial is launching in the St. Paul’s Hospital (SPH) emergency department this week (June 11). The Rapid Agitation Control with Ketamine in the Emergency Department (RACKED) Study will compare the effectiveness of intramuscular ketamine to a standard combination of intramuscular medications in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with agitation and violent behaviour. ED physician David Barbic will…
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Since 2001, the MSFHR Scholar Program has supported more than 400 early-career health researchers as they establish independent research careers, build leading health research programs and train the next generation of scientists to support the long-term success of the BC health research landscape. This year, 17 exceptional BC researchers join this distinguished group, working in areas including youth mental health,…
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Dr. Suzanne Lewis Takes a Personalized Approach to Understanding Autism

For BC Children’s Hospital investigator Dr. Suzanne Lewis, the future of diagnosing and treating children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) lies in the power of personalized medicine. In personalized medicine, patients receive therapies uniquely tailored to their biological and genetic makeup. It’s an individualized approach that, according to Dr. Lewis, may be the key to advancing care for ASD, a complex…
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Listening to the Silent Pain of Endometriosis

Endometriosis— a condition in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows in other parts of the body—affects ten per cent of Canadian women of reproductive age and is associated with pain and infertility. That’s approximately a million Canadians. But endometriosis can go undiagnosed for years, while its debilitating symptoms cost $2 billion annually in lost productivity and health care…
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Three outstanding cancer research teams will receive nearly $13 million to continue their investigations into rare tumours, an inherited disorder (Li-Fraumeni Syndrome) and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound to improve treatments for breast cancer. Two teams primarily based in Ontario and the other in BC will receive the funding from the Terry Fox Research Institute (TFRI)…
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