For many, summer isn’t complete without fields of purple and the sweet smell of lavender. Valued especially for its pleasant aroma, a new study from UBC’s Okanagan campus has discovered the gene that gives lavender its iconic smell and researchers hope that one day it might lead to a super-smelling plant. Lavender essential oil contains many different types of compounds,…
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The Research Trainee Program is one of MSFHR’s flagship funding opportunities. Since 2001, we’ve supported more than 1,200 Research Trainees  ̶  health researchers in the training phase of their careers  ̶  to protect time for research and career development, ultimately supporting the long-term success of the BC health research landscape. This year, 33 talented research trainees will receive salary support as they establish their careers…
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This study provides new insights into the machinery that mediates uptake of iron as an essential nutrient, as well as mechanisms of trafficking of iron between organelles; it also establishes the relevance of endocytosis in the pathogenicity of C. neoformans. Specifically, we found that the Vps45 protein, which regulates vesicle fusion, participates in the trafficking of iron into fungal cells, supports mitochondria function, mediates antifungal resistance and is required for virulence…
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For twenty years, researchers thought they knew everything there was to know about the composition of neurexin, a protein that connects neurons and is essential for communication within the brain. Neurexin is a key building block of synapses, the specialized sites where neurons connect and signal via chemical messengers. For a long time, researchers believed they understood this unique gene…
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Congratulations to the BCCHRI CIHR Grant Recipients!

We are pleased to congratulate the BC Children’s and BC Women’s investigators who were awarded funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Project Grant Spring 2018 competition, as well as the BC Children’s investigators who received funding from the recent CIHR Foundation and Team Grant competitions. Our research community received more than $4.9 million in new grants and awards…
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Upon injury, a healthy adult lung has the robust ability to regenerate and replace damaged cells.1 Despite this healing capacity, respiratory disease remains a leading cause of death worldwide; therefore, understanding the molecular processes that control lung repair is an important research goal in uncovering new therapies. Lung repair is a complex process that involves activation of progenitor cells, populations of…
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Dexamethasone Prodrugs as Potent Suppressors of the Immunostimulatory Effects of Lipid Nanoparticle Formulations of Nucleic Acids

In this publication, using a prodrug approach, we demonstrate the ability to co-deliver different therapeutic agents within a single nanoparticle. Co-delivery has always been very challenging and here, we are able to deliver two classes of drugs (i.e. macromolecules, such as nucleic acids, along with small molecules like corticosteroids). This combination was chosen because nucleic acid therapeutics generally cause an undesired immune stimulation in the patient which is managed by administration of immunosuppressants…
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Bacteria go extinct at substantial rates, although appear to avoid the mass extinctions that have hit larger forms of life on Earth, according to new research from the University of British Columbia (UBC), Caltech, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The finding contradicts widely held scientific thinking that microbe taxa, because of their very large populations, rarely die off. The study,…
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In a single hour, more solar energy hits the Earth than all of humankind uses in a year, making solar power an attractive option for renewable energy. But what if you live somewhere like Vancouver, known for its rainy and overcast skies? Vancouver-based researcher Vikramaditya Yadav, professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of British Columbia, was inspired by nature…
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Dr. Martin Gleave is the recipient of the fifth annual Dr. Chew Wei Memorial Prize in Cancer Research for his work to improve outcomes from prostate cancer, which has spanned surgery, molecular manipulation in the search for new treatments, and managing the challenge of taking lab discoveries to market.  The UBC Faculty of Medicine bestows this award  annually to a Canadian physician or scientist…
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