A recent study shows that a gamechanger drug called Fevipiprant promises to lower patients’ risks of suffering an asthma attack and being admitted to a hospital. This is the first time a drug reducing airway smooth muscle mass — a key clinical indicator of disease severity that increases the likelihood of more frequent asthma attacks and even deaths — has been reported. Along with Rod Smallwood, fellow…
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From the anti-vaccine movement to the belief that the earth is flat, there seems to a growing distrust of science and institutions, and experts say it’s difficult to come up with an antidote to the erosion. A distrust in scientific institutions and conspiracy theories are nothing new. Some say that the moon landing was a hoax; others claim Tupac Shakur is still alive. And then…
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At home DNA testing kits have made it easier than ever for the average person to learn about their genes, unlocking information about everything from their genealogical ancestries to their risks for developing certain conditions. More than 26 million people have already had home DNA tests. But with this glut of data, some very important questions arise: How do we create a world where genetic…
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What a difference a year makes. Canada’s 2019 budget, released on 19 March, includes modest increases for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government priorities, including neuroscience and genomics research ― nothing like the historic five-year, Can$4-billion (US$3-billion) boostfor basic science and research unveiled in 2018. The 2019 funding plan would also create an advisory body that would subject future government funding decisions…
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Through Budget 2019, the Government of Canada has signalled its continued confidence in Canadian stem cell and regenerative medicine research with a multi-year investment of $18 million through the Stem Cell Network (SCN). For nearly two decades, SCN has been working to develop a diverse and collaborative national network of research experts, industry and not for profit organizations who are…
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In 2018, Ottawa brought down an impressive “science budget” for Canada. Most signals indicate that this year’s federal budget will focus on skills – ensuring that learners finish their first degree or diploma ready to go to work. It is important, however, to recognize and support the value of graduate degrees. As an organization of concerned graduate students and postdoctoral…
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You’ve probably heard of Stephen Hawking, Albert Einstein and Mark Zuckerberg. But can you name a woman scientist or engineer? Half of Canadians can’t, suggests a new poll. The online survey of 1,511 Canadians was commissioned by the non-profit group Girls Who Code and conducted by the market research firm Maru/Blue from March 1-3 and released for International Women’s Day today.…
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Innovation Nation: We cannot afford or excuse this double-jeopardy for Canadian prosperity — jobs without people and people without jobs In every sector you can name, digital innovation, particularly the potential of artificial intelligence, is driving dramatic change. A recent report from RBC estimates that 25 per cent of current Canadian jobs will be heavily impacted by technology — and…
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Sex & Gender in Research 101

What is sex and gender? The consideration of sex and gender when designing and implementing health studies is critical in producing the best possible health research evidence. There is a growing expectation that people use appropriate language when discussing these concepts. Introduced in the Spring 2018 Project Grant competition, CIHR now requires that all applicants integrate sex and gender into…
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Marie Curie, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Brenda Milner, Martha Salcudean, Julie Payette, Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson. What do these names bring to mind? They are women whose pioneering work led the fight against cancer, ground-breaking discoveries about how brain cells live and die and to the unveiling of the secrets of human memory. They are leaders in innovation in mechanical engineering and space exploration. They were among the first…
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