As strange as it is to think about, many bacteria live in the human body, most of which are found in the gut (often referred to as the gut microbiome). These bodily roommates affect health in many ways that are only beginning to be understood.  In a presentation at the 2019 American Academy of Neurology annual meeting titled, “The Gut Microbiota and Pediatric…
Read More
The Centre for Blood Research has many talented graduate students, postdocs and faculty doing cutting edge research in important fields, but they also have exciting lives outside of the lab. In the CBR Newsletter, we have started a column to honour the secret talents and skills that CBR members have. Last month I introduced Lauren Wilkinson a Microbiology and Immunology…
Read More
Investigators at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Centre for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics (CMMT) and BC Children’s Hospital have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease. “This discovery may enable us to provide families with additional information,” said lead author Galen Wright, a research associate in…
Read More
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery—all without cutting skin. The researchers describe the technology in a study published today in Science Advances. “Our technology allows us to scan tissue quickly, and when we see a suspicious or abnormal cell…
Read More

New MRI Study Assesses Myelin and Iron as Biomarkers in the Brain

A new computational tissue model from Dr. Alex Rauscher and his team has enabled the researchers to quantify brain myelin and iron from MRI scans, offering new clues as to the role of myelin and iron in tissue damage and disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Published recently in the journal NMR Biomedicine, their paper reveals a difference in brain iron between people with MS, their…
Read More
Published in Clinical Cancer Research, the study found a small group of patients whose pancreatic cancer carried a rare trait that was potentially treatable with a targeted therapy often used to treat lung cancer. After receiving treatment, those patients’ health improved. Pancreatic cancer is currently the fourth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Canada, with 700 people diagnosed each year in British…
Read More

Stress Can Lead to Heart Failure

When encountering a charging predator or participating in a triathlon, the human heart responds by beating faster to increase blood supply to muscles. It is a natural and well-understood reaction to stress. However, there are times when emotional or physical stress causes the heart to beat with an irregular or abnormal rhythm, a condition called arrhythmia that is the focus…
Read More
AbCellera today announced the addition of leading researchers from the Vaccine Research Center  at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health,  and Ichor Medical Systems (Ichor) to its Pandemic Prevention Platform (P3) team. AbCellera assembled the consortium in response to a high-priority initiative from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to enable rapid response to…
Read More

Protein Potential

Protein analysis is a bit like studying a stellar object with space probes. Since the 1930s, Pluto was a fuzzy, grainy image, until New Horizons provided a much sharper view of the planet. Similarly, modern protein analysis is able to zoom in close to the action — and could soon be getting as much attention as genetics. “People think the action happens…
Read More