$9.7 Million Awarded to Kidney Transplantation Research

Genome Canada has awarded $9.7 million to a project co-led by researchers at Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) that could change the face of transplant care. The funding will support a groundbreaking study—co-led by Dr. Paul Keown and Dr. Stirling Bryan from University of British Columbia, Dr. Ruth Sapir-Pichhadze from McGill University and Dr. Timothy Caulfield from University of Alberta—that aims…
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Skin Substitute Provides the Building Blocks for Wound Repair

A new product developed in BC by Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) scientist Dr. Aziz Ghahary may solve the painful health burden of slow healing wounds. These wounds include pressure ulcers (or bedsores), large burns, and diabetic sores. They are very costly to treat. In BC alone, the cost of treating pressure ulcers in spinal cord patients is about…
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Good Bug, Bad Bug: Breaking Through Microbial Stereotypes

Our expanding knowledge of microbial mechanisms is challenging the notion of “good” versus “bad” microbes and encouraging a better understanding of their roles in various contexts before their widespread therapeutic and clinical application. The intestinal microbe Akkermansia muciniphila, a promising probiotic with an emerging cautionary tale, best highlights this challenge.
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Precision health promises to transform the way Canadians receive medical care. In the near future, doctors may be able to precisely diagnose symptoms based on a patient’s unique genetic makeup and offer personalized treatment that improves health outcomes and saves lives. Genomics research combined with data analytics will lead to better prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases, improve the health…
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Vancouver Prostate Centre investigators were highly successful, receiving 6 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) research grants in the Fall 2017 Project Grant competition for a total of $3.6 million over five years. The funded projects are: Ralph Buttyan (co-Is: Artem Cherkasov, Nathan Lack, Na Li): Interference with Gli to Control Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer. 3 years. $344,250
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For years, researchers have investigated approaches to prevent cancer-causing cells from multiplying in the body. Now, Vancouver Prostate Centre (VPC) scientist Dr. Christopher Ong and colleagues have discovered a critical gene that drives cancer growth. From this discovery, they developed a new protein-based medication that prevents unhealthy cell growth that leads to prostate cancer, and potentially other cancers. “This is the first-of-its-kind…
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Hypoxia Induces Selective Modifications to the Acetylome in the Brain of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Reversible protein acetylation is an important regulatory mechanism for modulating protein function. The cellular protein acetylome is in large part dictated by the cellular redox balance, and in particular [NAD+]. While the relationship between hypoxia, redox balance, energy charge and resulting mitochondrial dysfunction has been examined in the context of hypoxia-linked pathologies, little is known about the direct effects of…
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CQDM and Brain Canada are proud to announce the non-dilutive funding of $1 M to AbCellera and the University of British Columbia. AbCellera will also contribute $450,000 to the project, which will expand and apply its state-of-the-art microfluidic antibody discovery platform for discovery of function-modifying antibodies against GPCR targets. The CQDM support was made possible by the financial contributions of…
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Lisa Decotret knows firsthand the destructive effects of cancer, she is a childhood cancer survivor herself. Decotret was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma when she was 13 and received treatment at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. After beating cancer, she decided to give back to the medical community by pursuing studies in cancer research. “I’ve always wanted to do research about…
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Monogenetic diseases offer clear human validation for launching drug discovery programs in Pharma designed to develop important new medicines for unmet medical needs. However, mismatches in the genotype-phenotype of presenting patients complicate both the preclinical ‘research target profile’ and the clinical development strategy. Additional biological and pathophysiological data associated with the identified mutations are necessary for more optimal prosecution of…
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