Identifying Treatment-Resistant Prostate Cancer Faster

A simple blood test helps doctors recognize treatment resistance and recommend alternatives sooner. Patients can now know whether they have treatment-resistant prostate cancer from a simple blood test—giving clinicians additional time to administer alternative therapies. The promising finding is a result of a new study co-authored by Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) researcher Dr. Alexander Wyatt.
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We have uncovered protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a critical therapeutic target in drug-resistant blood cancer cells, including blood cancer stem cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients.  ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) monotherapy is the current standard-of-care treatment for CML, which allows most patients to remain in clinical remission, but early relapse and resistant disease prevent many patients from being cured.
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LifeSciences BC is pleased to announce the recipients of the 20th Annual LifeSciences BC Awards, presented by FARRIS. These awards are presented annually to recognize talented individuals and organizations that represent the life sciences ecosystem in B.C. which includes; academia, health institutions, government and industry. The award winners represent the full spectrum from discovery to commercialization, underscoring the depth of…
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MS Researcher-Led Event Encourages Teenagers to Choose Science

In Grade 10, fifteen- and sixteen-year-olds begin making the academic decisions that may shape their lives, opting for electives in the sciences or the arts. What they choose will influence where they plan to go to university, what they plan to study, and who they ultimately become. For many scientists, their earliest interest in science is sparked by someone else.…
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 Pascal Biosciences Inc. (TSX.V:PAS) (“Pascal” or the “Company”) today announced the Company has discovered certain cannabinoids that enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, rendering them more susceptible to recognition by the immune system. This discovery is important because the leading class of new cancer fighting agents, termed “checkpoint inhibitors”, activates the immune system to destroy cancer cells. Enhancing recognition of cancer…
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More than half of government scientists in Canada—53%—do not feel they can speak freely to the media about their work, even after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government eased restrictions on what they can say publicly, according to a survey released today by a union that represents more than 16,000 federal scientists. That union—the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada…
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A Vancouver team led by TFRI-funded investigator Dr. David Huntsman has discovered an important therapeutic target for treating small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT). This is a rare, but extremely lethal, ovarian cancer in young women with no effective treatment. The present study, published in The Journal of Pathology (June 2017), suggests that SCCOHT tumour cells need the activity of…
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Various kinases, including a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family member, regulate the growth and functions of primary cilia, which perform essential roles in signaling and development. Neurological disorders linked to CDK-Like (CDKL) proteins suggest that these underexplored kinases may have similar functions. Here, we present the crystal structures of human CDKL1, CDKL2, CDKL3, and CDKL5, revealing their evolutionary divergence from CDK and mitogen-activated…
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Dr. Natalie Strynadka is a Distinguished Professor and researcher in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of British Columbia and a member of the Centre for Blood Research (CBR). She is known for her research in the fields of antibiotic resistance and biophysics. Dr. Strynadka recently received the honour of being chosen as the 2018 Fellow…
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New MS Model Provides Hope for Better Understanding of Disease Pathology

Until now, researchers studying multiple sclerosis (MS) in mouse models have relied on models heavily weighted towards processes secondary to an autoimmune trigger. While discoveries made through these models have informed later translational research and clinical trials to improve drug treatment for people living with MS, a lack of a model for the unique biological process by which the disease…
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