New Research Finds Brain Injury Causes Impulse Control Problems in Rats

New research from Dr. Catharine Winstanley‘s lab confirms for the first time that even mild brain injury can result in impulse control problems in rats. The study, published in the Journal of Neurotrauma, also found that the impulsivity problems may be linked to levels of an inflammatory molecule in the brain, and suggest that targeting the molecule could be helpful for…
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Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT) is a rare but extremely lethal ovarian cancer in young women due to lack of effective treatment. Our current study suggests that SCCOHT tumor cells need the activity of an enzyme called EZH2 for their survival. This enzyme adds methyl groups to the dedicated site of histones, a group of proteins that maintain the proper structure of DNA, and thereby controls which genes to turn on or off. Two EZH2 inhibitors, both in various clinical...
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Stat3 Regulates Centrosome Clustering in Cancer Cells via Stathmin/PLK1

Cancer cells have been observed to frequently have amplified centrosomes. These amplified centrosomes must be actively clustered together for cancer cells to divide. Since normal cells do not have centrosome amplification, targeting centrosome clustering is a highly specific way to target cancer cells while sparing normal cells. We performed an automated screen for compounds that inhibited centrosome clustering and identified a Stat3 inhibitor. We are currently trying...
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Vaccines have rightly come to be regarded as one of modern medicine’s greatest accomplishments, having prevented millions of cases of smallpox, yellow fever, polio, tetanus and other debilitating, often deadly diseases. But UBC vaccine expert Tobias Kollmann would be one of the last people to declare victory. He sees all of the diseases caused by pathogens for which no vaccine…
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Dr. Terrance (Terry) Snutch was recently inducted as a Fellow in the National Academy of Inventors, receiving the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors in recognition of his work as a “luminary of innovation and invention.” Dr. Snutch, Director of Translational Neuroscience at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and Canada Research Chair in Biotechnology and Genomics –…
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The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD), Canada’s national drug development and commercialization engine is pleased to announce the appointment of Matthew J. Carlyle, CFA, as Chief Financial Officer effective immediately. Mr. Carlyle brings extensive experience and relationships across global biotechnology and venture capital to CDRD, having been a partner of a national venture capital firm, CFO of a…
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Reappraisal of TDP-43 Pathology in FTLD-U Subtypes

Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau-negative, ubiquitin-immunoreactive (-ir) pathology (FTLD-U) is subclassified based on the type and cortical laminar distribution of neuronal inclusions. Following the discovery of the transactive response DNA-binding protein Mr 43 kD (TDP-43) as the ubiquitinated protein in most FTLD-U, the same pathological criteria have been used to classify FTLD cases based on TDP-43-ir changes. However, the fact…
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Nearly 1 in 150 Canadians are infected with Hepatitis C (HCV). British Columbia has an even higher average, affecting nearly 1 in every 50 residents. While antiviral drugs can lead to effective cures in more than 90% of patients, their efficacy is challenged by drug resistant strains of the virus leading to viral relapse after therapy. Considering the extremely high…
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An avid science enthusiast, Austin Wang began working in the laboratories of Dr. William Mohn, Dr. Susan Baldwin, and Dr. Steven Hallam at the University of British Columbia while still a student at David Thompson Secondary in Vancouver. In 2016, Austin traveled to Phoenix, Arizona to compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, taking home the grand prize…
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This week, global experts will gather at the University of British Columbia to discuss the latest trends in 3D bioprinting—a technology used to create living tissues and organs. In this Q&A, UBC chemical and biological engineering professor Vikramaditya Yadav, who is also with the Regenerative Medicine Cluster Initiative in B.C., explains how bioprinting could potentially transform healthcare and drug development,…
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