Prof. Jim Kronstad was honoured on Thursday May 4th in a celebration commemorating his 9 years as the MSL Director. In the words of his predecessor, Prof. Phil Hieter, the event was for a man “with a lot of honour and integrity”. These heartfelt sentiments resonated throughout the afternoon as Prof. Kronstad received praise for his creativity, wisdom, strength, hard-working…
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Copaxone is an efficacious and safe therapy that has demonstrated clinical benefit for over two decades in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). On an individual level, patients show variability in their response to Copaxone, with some achieving significantly higher response levels. The involvement of genes (e.g., HLA-DRB1*1501) with high inter-individual variability in Copaxone’s mechanism of action (MoA)…
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“In theory, cerebral edema is a very simple issue; it’s the movement of water from the blood into the brain by osmosis, causing brain swelling. When water is drawn into nerve cells, the brain expands in the skull and that’s where you see severe complications from stroke or traumatic brain injury,” explains Dr. Nick Weilinger. “My work in the MacVicar…
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Congratulations to HLI Principal Investigator Dr. John Boyd for winning the 2017 Providence Health Care Research Institute Innovative and Translational Research Award. This award supports clinical research projects to improve patient care. The award will fund Dr. Boyd’s project, Ex vivo Heart Perfusion: Doubling the Number of Heart Transplants performed in British Columbia. Many patients with end-stage heart failure die due…
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The Nuts and Bolts of Peanut Allergies

The humble peanut butter and jelly sandwich, once a common lunchbox favourite, now features on the ban list in many Canadian schools. The seemingly innocuous peanut has potentially lethal consequences for the 2 out of every 100 Canadian children who suffer from allergies (1). Peanuts are at the top of the most reaction-causing foods, among tree nuts, cow’s milk, eggs,…
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For Banting Scholar Dr. Brianne Kent, Research Is All about Rhythm

“The great thing about working with both patients and pre-clinical models is that the research truly is translational,” says Dr. Brianne Kent. “Understanding patients with Alzheimer disease helps me to ask the right questions, better inform study design, and delve into the mechanisms of the disease in a holistic way.” Dr. Kent, already a Killam Laureate and Michael Smith Foundation…
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Effects of Hyperoxia on Dyspnoea and Exercise Endurance in Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease

Dyspnoea is a major source of distress and is the hallmark symptom of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Supplemental oxygen may alleviate dyspnoea by attenuating arterial oxygen desaturation, increasing oxygen delivery and reducing the drive to breathe; however, previous studies show conflicting results on the effectiveness of supplemental oxygen on dyspnoea and exercise performance in ILD [1–6]. Methodological factors…
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Four postdoctoral fellows from the Faculty of Medicine are among 10 recipients from UBC to receive the 2016-2017 Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship. There are 70 fellowships awarded nationally. These prestigious fellowships provide each researcher with $70,000 each year for two years to support research that will positively contribute to Canada’s economic, social and research-based growth.
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“If there is one thing we have to keep doing, it is explaining and making the case for research – of all types: basic and applied,” David Naylor, former University of Toronto president, told the packed room. He was addressing 200 of the nation’s scientists and researchers who had gathered last week at Metro Toronto Convention Centre to discuss the…
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