In her most recent Forward Thinking post, Dr. Bev Holmes unpacked what it means to be a responsible and responsive health research funder during a pandemic. With my first Forward Thinking post in my new role as Vice President, Research for MSFHR, I reflect on what success looks like for responsive and responsible research funding. Forward Thinking is MSFHR’s blog focusing on what it takes…
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To say that the past few months have been “challenging” would be a hefty understatement. Amid a global pandemic, countless aspects of our lives have undergone a radical shift: adapting to physical distancing, working from home, as well as dealing with the financial, social, and emotional toll of COVID-19. Everyday activities and long-awaited special occasions alike have either gone virtual…
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Ovarian cancer, the fifth most common cause of cancer death in Canadian women, has several subtypes, one of which is Adult Granulosa Cell Tumours (AGCT), the subtype accounting for two to five per cent of ovarian cancer cases. In 2009, in a landmark study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, BC Cancer’s Dr. David Huntsman collaborated with researchers at the GSC to…
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Autophagy is a highly regulated process in the cell that removes or recycles unnecessary or dysfunctional molecules, breaking them down and reusing them to assemble new cellular structures. In cancer, it has been shown to contribute to both disease suppression and progression depending on a number of factors, including the stage of the disease. In advanced cancer, it enhances tumour cell survival and…
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Earl W. Davie: 1927-2020

Earl W. Davie, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry, died Saturday, June 6 at the age of 92. Dr. Davie was best known for his work in blood coagulation, having published a seminal paper with Oscar Ratnoff in 1964 describing the “waterfall” sequence of coagulation. In this paper, they showed that the production of the active serine protease thrombin resulted from a…
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Dr. Michael Kobor, department of medical genetics, Dr. Brett Finlay, department of biochemistry and molecular biology, and Dr. Sara Mostafavi, department of medical genetics, are part of a cross-disciplinary team that received funding from the Manulife CIFAR Population Health & Well-being Grant Program. The grant provides funding for CIFAR Program Members to study various social, behavioural, and public health-related aspects of COVID-19. The…
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Advances in sequencing technology have led to an explosion in the number of known genetic variants of human genes. A major challenge arising from this insight is to determine which of these variants contribute to diseases as a result of their effect on gene function. In a new paper, “Sentinel interaction mapping – a generic approach for the functional analysis…
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Insulin sends strong signals to the body to store fat in a range of tissues. Too much insulin circulating in the bloodstream is known to lead to accumulation of adipose tissue. At the same time, mice with reduced insulin have increased energy expenditure. A team led by Jim Johnson established this seeming paradox in previous work, in which the underlying mechanisms…
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Endometrial carcinoma, the most common gynaecological cancer, develops from endometrial epithelium which is composed of secretory and ciliated cells. Pathologic classification is unreliable and there is a need for prognostic tools. We used single cell sequencing to study organoid model systems derived from normal endometrial endometrium to discover novel markers specific for endometrial ciliated or secretory cells. A marker of…
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