Amy Inkster is the 2019 winner of the Biology of Sex Differences Best Poster Prize at the recent OSSD meeting in May. This Q&A provides an overview of her research into sex differences in placentas and how this can impact the pregnancy and postnatal outcomes. At the May meeting of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences (OSSD), Dr…
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Children should have a future, not cancer. But, just before her first birthday, Rory was fighting for her future. Born with a teratoma, a type of tumour in the germ cells, she underwent surgery and fought through related complications. As if cancer surgery wasn’t enough for any child to face, the potentially devastating side effects of chemotherapy treatment would also…
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Despite having the right conditions for innovation — from educated workers to strong research centres — many Canadian-invented patents are being snapped up by foreign firms rather than being developed by Canadian ones, a new study says. The report published by the Institute for Research on Public Policy says Canadians are increasingly likely to transfer or sell their intellectual property to foreign entities, especially with deep-pocketed American companies keen to invest in…
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The authors employed expertise in DNA sequencing and analysis to characterize the genetics of tumour cells in patients, in the laboratory and in mice. Their findings demonstrated that while the Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) mouse model resembles the human disease and may provide valuable insights into GBM, variations in how the cancer cells behave in the human, mouse and laboratory settings do exist.
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A total of nine UBC faculty members have been announced by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) as Fellows and as Members of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. Seven UBC faculty have been named Fellows of the Royal Society of Canada. The fellowship of the RSC comprises over 2000 Canadian scholars, artists, and scientists, peer-elected as the best in…
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It is increasingly evident that non–protein-coding regions of the genome can give rise to transcripts that form functional layers of the cancer genome. One of most abundant classes in these regions is long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). They have gained increasing attention in prostate cancer (PCa) and paved the way for a greater understanding of these cryptic regulators in cancer. Objective…
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By bringing genetics into clinical medicine, the University of British Columbia medical geneticist helped to identify the gene mutations responsible for many rare diseases. At a 1978 genetics conference in Montana, Philip Pallister, then the clinical director of the Boulder River School and Hospital, asked medical geneticist Judith Hall and a group of other researchers a rather startling question: Should we dig…
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Breaking Down Cancer with Genomics

“It was like a miracle.” Trish Keating was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2010 and after surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, she was told in 2013 when her cancer returned that it was terminal. After enrolling in the Personalized Onco-Genomics (POG) Program at BC Cancer, the team of experts discovered Trish’s cancer was driven by a specific protein. They then…
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Eight Simon Fraser University researchers have been named to the Royal Society of Canada—seven of them as fellows of the society and one as a member of the society’s College of New Scholars, Scientists and Artists. Membership in the Royal Society is Canada’s highest academic honour. Established in 1882 as Canada’s national academy, the society promotes research and learning in the…
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