2018 Faculty of Medicine Award Recipients

Each year, the Faculty of Medicine recognizes faculty and staff members for excellence in teaching, research, administration, innovation and public service. Amongst other award winners, Dr. John Cairns in the UBC Department of Medicine has been awarded the UBC Award for Excellence in Mentoring Early Career Faculty. This award recognizes faculty members who have formally been identified as mentors and…
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Concussions Loosen Insulation around Brain Cells

Detailed scans of concussed University of British Columbia hockey players found that the protective fatty tissue surrounding brain cell fibers was loosened two weeks after the injury—even though the athletes felt fine and were deemed ready to return to the ice. A loosening of that insulation, called myelin, slows the transmission of electrical signals between brain cells, or neurons. Researchers have…
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CDRD Academy Announces Inaugural Cohort in Unique New National Executive Institute

CDRD – The Centre for Drug Research and Development, Canada’s national life sciences venture, is pleased to announce the first cohort of the CDRD Academy’s Executive Institute. Earlier this year, CDRD and Pfizer Canada announced the launch of the Executive Institute under the umbrella of The CDRD Academy. The Institute is a 10-month, focused executive development program open to a…
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Vancouver urologists are shining new light — literally — on cancerous bladder lesions, with a new tool that makes malignant cells appear pink when fluorescent blue light is shone on them. The conventional tool used to see malignant cells in the bladder is a white light camera-tipped instrument called a cystoscope that’s passed through the urethra to the bladder. But…
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Biochemist and molecular biologist Matthew Dahabieh (BSc 06’, MSc 08’, PhD 13’) originally planned to head to medical school, but along the way got sidetracked by a tiny but mighty microorganism. Now Dahabieh is on the lookout for problems he can solve with yeast. When did you get interested in research and development? Looking for opportunities in scientific research, I…
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Cell autonomous immunity is the ability of individual cells to initiate a first line of host defense against invading microbes, such as viruses. Autophagy receptors, a diverse family of multivalent proteins, play a key role in this host response by detecting, sequestering, and eliminating virus in a process termed virophagy. To counteract this, positive-stranded RNA viruses, such as enteroviruses, have…
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TRIUMF is Trying to Create the Rarest Drug on Earth

Using a particle accelerator, a team of scientists at TRIUMF is attempting to make a rare radioactive element, actinium, that could revolutionize cancer treatment. The video is created by Telus Storyhive, which supports compelling, original stories told by filmmakers from BC and Alberta by providing production funding, training and exposure to new audiences…
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Science is about knowledge. It involves the gathering of facts to help create predictions and provide explanations. But for women who have made science their career, there is seemingly no scientific explanation to explain the work challenges they face solely because of their gender. It’s an issue that Edmonton documentary filmmaker Brandy Yanchyk explores in her new film Ms. Scientist. The film goes to  Alberta, Ontario,…
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B.C. researchers have discovered a way to identify multiple strains of HIV that lay dormant in the cells of an individual. HIV evolves continually while it is active, storing versions of itself in the DNA of infected cells that then go dormant, waiting to reactivate at some future date, like an archive of genetically unique “time bombs,” said Zabrina Brumme, director of…
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