Meet the Researcher: Dr. Ed Pryzdial

Prof. Ed Pryzdial was one of the first people that I met when I joined the Centre for Blood Research (CBR). I remember in our first encounter when I introduced myself to him he said, “I know you; I knew you were joining the CBR before you knew!” Ever since, I always thought of Ed (Pryzdial) as the best friend…
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Awards Support Innovative Research

Future health care needs require visionary approaches to tackle the challenges confronting patients and their families today. From curing disease to improving quality of life, researchers are at the forefront of medical advances that support the health and happiness of patients and their families. For this reason, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) is proud to contribute to groundbreaking research…
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Cody Lo is a first year medical student at the University of British Columbia working as a research assistant in the laboratory of Dr. Bruce Carleton at the BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute.Cody has worked in almost a dozen different academic laboratories since he started as an undergraduate at UBC. We sat down with Cody to discuss how his medical and research interests intersect, and where these interests will take him in the future…
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In this publication we explore how two miRNAs that are always deleted in a type of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, a marrow failure/leukemia syndrome) regulate blood stem cells and progenitor cells differentially. Our findings suggest that these two miRNAs, miR-143 and miR-145, regulate the TGF-beta signaling pathway through a protein called DAB2. When these miRNAs are lost in MDS, activation of the TGF-beta pathway depletes blood stem cells…
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Treatment includes surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or hormonal therapy, likely a combination depending on the individual’s disease. Patients with a large breast tumour or palpable lymph nodes often receive chemotherapy first, followed by surgery. During chemotherapy, a doctor performs breast exams and occasional imaging to monitor the tumour and assess how much it is shrinking.​ Given that the degree of…
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MSFHR Funding Offers Opportunity to Expand Scope of MRI Potential

In 2011, when Dr. Shannon Kolind was splitting her time as a postdoctoral fellow between Oxford University and King’s College London, a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) trainee award helped her decide between staying in the United Kingdom where she’d continue her work in physics, or returning home to take on a more translational research program with the MRI Research Centre at…
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Presenilin-1 (PSEN1) is the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex, and pathogenic mutations in the PSEN1 gene account for the majority cases of familial AD (FAD). FAD-associated mutant PSEN1 proteins have been shown to affect APP processing and Aβ generation and inhibit Notch1 cleavage and Notch signaling. In this report, we found that a PSEN1 mutation (S169del) altered APP processing…
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Dr. Faranak Farzan, Assistant Professor in the School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering at Simon Fraser University, was one of 17 exceptional BC-based health researchers to be awarded a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar Award. Find out which other Vancouver researchers won grants, awards, fellowships, and scholarships in our June award summar!
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On June 14, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) announced the recipients of their 2018 Scholar Awards. This year, three of the seventeen awardees are CHÉOS Scientists — Drs. Anne Gadermann, Ehsan Karim, and Skye Barbic. The MSFHR Scholar Program supports the development of B.C.’s research talent by providing salary support to scientists who are building strong research programs…
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UBC researchers have matched small proteins, called peptides, with antibiotics so they can work together to combat hard-to-treat infections that don’t respond well to drugs on their own. The study builds on previous research that showed that the peptides are key to making harmful bacteria more responsive to drugs. “We had developed information from earlier experiments that showed there was…
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