The authors found that there is a ribosomal RNA hyper-modification called 1-methyl-3-α-amino-α-carboxyl-propyl pseudouridine (macpΨ) that is perturbed in human cancers. The modification is 1.5 billion years conserved (all eukaryotes have it, no exceptions). 45% of colorectal cancer (CRC) tumours have a partial loss of this modification, and the same phenotype is seen in >22 distinct types of cancers.
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Between May 4-8, 2020, the UBC Centre for Heart Lung Innovation (HLI) was proud to host the first-ever Faculty of Medicine Career Week virtually via Zoom Webinar. Despite ongoing physical distancing measures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the HLI Trainee Association, supported by Education Director Dr. Scott Tebbutt and Research & Industry Partnerships Manager Dr. Tony Yang, organized an exciting program of…
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Opinion: In times like these it’s essential to keep our teams of research scientists and engineers engaged and supported. We all hope for a COVID-19 vaccine that will save lives and allow for a full economic and social recovery. Even in this welcome scenario, the economic reactivation and return to community life will be challenging. Canada most likely needs to…
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From life-saving cancer treatments to clean technologies that protect our environment, thousands of research staff in Canada are driving discoveries and innovations that support our well-being and our economy. When we need them the most, many members of Canada’s academic research community have been forced to temporarily suspend their work due to COVID-19. To ensure they can keep their jobs,…
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There’s a system of hormones in our bodies that controls blood pressure called the renin-angiotensin system. The crucial parts, for this story, are: a hormone called angiotensin; and some enzymes that convert it, aka angiotensin converting enzymes – A C E. This is what ACE2 stands for. One of the people who first discovered much of this is Austrian researcher…
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We are pleased to welcome you to our inaugural podcast! We will be producing a series covering topics from COVID-19 to the collapsing honey bee colonies. Our first episode is How Genomics Helped Crack the Code of COVID-19. In the early stages of a pandemic, the world needs answers fast.  Genomics, the mapping of genes, is helping to find those answers…
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It is widely known that age affects a person’s likelihood of receiving a cancer diagnosis, including breast cancer. A study published today in Nature Cancer, highlights a better understanding of the relationship not only between age and breast cancer but also between age related changes in estrogen in the development of breast cancer. “What this study is doing for the first…
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Towards Stem Cell Therapies for Skeletal Muscle Repair

Skeletal muscle is an ideal target for cell therapy. The use of its potent stem cell population in the form of autologous intramuscular transplantation represents a tantalizing strategy to slow the progression of congenital muscle diseases (such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy) or regenerate injured tissue following trauma. The syncytial nature of skeletal muscle uniquely permits the engraftment of stem/progenitor cells…
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Detergents are not compatible with mass spectrometry, and their removal from biological samples often results in reduced protein identification. As an alternative to detergents, the authors recently developed the peptidisc membrane mimetic, which allows entrapment of the cell envelope proteome into water-soluble particles, termed a “peptidisc library”. Here, they employed a His-tagged version of the peptidisc peptide scaffold to enrich the reconstituted membrane proteome by affinity chromatography.
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